Koom’s Planter Box Update 7/26/12

Sorry these picture are not the best.  However the planter box is doing well.  All pepper plants have flowers on them.  My mint in the middle is growing fast.  I think some Moscow Mules are in order this weekend!!

 

 

Lettuce is doing great as well.  The pepper plants are taking up most of the sunlight from the window.  I think in a couple of weeks I will have nothing but the peppers and mint.

All for now.  I’ll let everyone know how the drinks turned out.

Cape Mayhem Gardens Update 6/18 – Garden Maintenance

Agridude - Cucumber Powdery Mildew LeafsSo last week I noticed that there were white spots on the cucumber leafs.  I did some googling and discovered that they have powdery mildew.  The picture on the left shows a large patch of it on one leaf, but if you look at the other leaves, you’ll see a bunch of white dots on the leaves.

 

Agridude - Neem OilI was told that I could remove the infected leaves, but too many of them are infected that I don’t know what would happen to the plant if I removed them all. Here is a pic of the Neem Oil that I bought at Walter Andersen Nursery.  We were all hanging out at the garden watching the US Open and I just happened to catch Jude biting his nails in this picture…

Agridude - Spraying Plants with Neem OilI removed a few of the very bad ones, and then sprayed the leafs down with Neem Oil.  Jude had his friends Hall, an Agridude, and Christina in town from Raleigh, NC. They garden and told me how much of oil to put on the leafs.  A light spray on each leaf should do the trick.  I was coating them pretty thick so I had to scale back.  We’ll see what happens in a week.

Hall and Christina shared a ton of good information and ideas with me.  They showed me how to prune/remove suckers on tomatoes.  Here is a link from my dad that shows you what to do.  By doing this, it puts more of the plants energy into making the fruit versus adding new leaves to the plant.

Agridude - Hall Removing Low BranchesThey also told me that I should remove the lowest branches on the tomato plants, especially if they touch the ground.  We also took out branches that had a lot of dead leaves on them since they are old and probably not doing much for the plant.  Here is Hall doing the pruning on our Green Zebra tomato.

 

Agridude - Planting OnionsWhile I was up in Hell A visiting another Agridude, Grant, we went to his local garden supply store and found a bunch of onion bulbs.  We planted 15 or so in LA in his garden, and within a week, they were shooting out of the ground.  I bought a few white onions and planted them in my garden yesterday.   You can see Kelly doing some pruning work for me too.  I had done 3 plants and my knees and back were tired so I had her help me out.  It is hard for a big man to get low to the ground for the pruning with so many other plants near by.  The onions will only make that tougher…

I also took some of the leachate from my worm bin and diluted it with water in a watering can and applied it to the plants around the base of each plant.  I did this to my patio plants and they all seemed to really perk up.  I am curious to see how the plants in the garden respond to this feeding.

Here are some other pictures I took yesterday of the garden, enjoy!

Agridude - Jalapenos

Jalapenos hanging off the plant

Agridude - Cucumbers Westside

Westside

Agridude - Cucumbers Ready to Eat

Sliced, sprinkled salt on top

Agridude - Hall and Pete

Agridudes Hall and Pete

A Quick Look at Jason’s MN Garden

This is some arugula that recently flowered.  The leaves will be more bitter now, because the plant is putting its energy into producing flowers.  The nutty flavor of this green is nice for spicing up a salad or bowl of pasta.  When cooking arugula make sure to add it to the dish late in the cooking process.  It is not quite as robust as spinach and can only handle a quick braise.

Flowering Arugula

This Blue Dwarf Kale is just about ready for harvest.  I used mulch around the plant to retain moisture and to reduce the competition from weeds.  The mulch is nice to use on beds that you do not plan on turning that same year.  If you don’t have mulch, try straw. It is a great alternative and breaks down much faster.  I look forward to sauteing the kale in some toasted sesame oil or bacon grease.

Blue Dwarf (Imp) Kale

The spring mix and spinach are dealing with some encroaching grass.  I need to do a better job of containing the growth in between my beds.  These crops have already been big producers for me this spring.  It is one of the better raised beds that I dug. I hope to get another couple weeks of production out of these guys, before the soil gets too warm.

Spring Mix

The butter leaf lettuce is doing pretty well.  I am going to let them get real big before I harvest.  The weather is going to stay cool, so there is little risk of them going to seed anytime soon.  However, once they do start to produce seeds, the plant will be way too bitter for consumption.

Butter Leaf Lettuce

Here is a cuke seedling. As you can see the cotyledons (original 2 leaves) have not dropped. Growth should start picking up in the next couple weeks.  I transplanted my toms and peps over the last couple weeks as well.  Minnesotans don’t have the benefit of a Mediterranean climate.  We have to wait for the soil to warm up into the 70s, before the cucurbits (Cucumbers, Zucchinis, Watermelons) and nightshades (Tomatoes, Peppers) start to show any significant growth.

Cucumber

Mint grows like a weed.  I had to pull up half the mint in my garden today to make room for tomatoes and cucumbers.  This perennial is great, even in northern climates, and helps make a mean mojito.  Just grab some rum, sugar in the raw, limes, and club soda, and you will be ready to mash up a tasty summer refreshment.

Mojito Farm

These peas were planted in late March, as soon as the soil thawed.  Snow peas take 60 days to reach maturity, which means I have been harvesting away this week.  You can plant peas multiple times throughout the season. So, stagger your plantings and make sure you start getting some in the ground again in late July, because peas are very cold tolerant and will survive into late October.  Peas also serve another purpose in the garden besides providing us with a good source of protein.  All legumes (Peas and Beans) put nitrogen back into the soil.  For this reason, it is a good idea to rotate them around your garden from year to year.

Peas
Peas